Armed Forces (album by Elvis Costello and the Attractions), designed by Barney Bubbles

[more]

- Ref P02-

(Source: santauro)

The Joshua Light Show

Writing for the New York Times in a 1969 article titled “You Don’t Have to Be High,” Barbara Bell reported on her sojourn to Bill Graham’s Fillmore East rock club on “freaky Second Avenue,” where she saw the Joshua Light Show produce “Mondrianesque checkerboards, strawberry fields, orchards of lime, antique jewels, galaxies of light over a pure black void and, often, abstract, erotic, totally absorbing shapes and colors for the joy of it—each a vision of an instant, wrapped in and around great waves of sound … first-nighters stagger out dazzled, muttering to themselves about amoebas in colored water.”

[more]

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(Source: eyexpression)

Poster for Dineke Oosting by Hansje Van Halem

New screen printed poster for Galerie Block C.  White and pink ink on brown glitter paper. Printed at Amsterdams Grafisch Atelier in an edition of 50.
[more]

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Poster for Dineke Oosting by Hansje Van Halem

New screen printed poster for Galerie Block C.
White and pink ink on brown glitter paper.
Printed at Amsterdams Grafisch Atelier in an edition of 50.

[more]

- Ref Ex 2 -

Saul Bass Artist’s Catalogue by Katie Flynn

14 page Artist Catalogue showcasing Saul Bass’ title sequence work. [more]

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The 10th Zine by Pink Rooster Studio

"New York just saw the launch of The Tenth, a new biannual zine about gay black life. It’s an ode to the exceptional, be they playwrights, artists, horticulturalists, stylists, beauties or anything beyond. As academic Frank Roberts says in his opening essay: “The publication blurs the lines between the high and the low, the past and the present, the popular and the underground; the sacred and the secular.”” - Stuart Brumfitt in Dazed And Confused Magazine. Read the rest of the article here.

Gravat Poster by Quim Marin

Gravat Poster by Quim Marin

(via hoploid)

By Robert Brownjohn, 1956

"In 1944, at age 19, Robert was accepted into the Institute of Design in Chicago, where he became a protégé of founder László Moholy-Nagy. Upon graduation, he worked as an architectural planner and then taught at the Institute of Design. After five years, he moved to New York to pursue a career in graphic design and in 1957, he founded Brownjohn, Chermayeff & Geismar (BCG) with fellow designers Ivan Chermayeff and Tom Geismar, who designed mainly for print, producing commercial projects as well as typographic experiments for clients as large as Pepsi-Cola."
link

By Robert Brownjohn, 1956

"In 1944, at age 19, Robert was accepted into the Institute of Design in Chicago, where he became a protégé of founder László Moholy-Nagy. Upon graduation, he worked as an architectural planner and then taught at the Institute of Design. After five years, he moved to New York to pursue a career in graphic design and in 1957, he founded Brownjohn, Chermayeff & Geismar (BCG) with fellow designers Ivan Chermayeff and Tom Geismar, who designed mainly for print, producing commercial projects as well as typographic experiments for clients as large as Pepsi-Cola."

link

(Source: thinkingform.com, via midcenturymoderndesign)

'MICROSONIC LANDSCAPE' by Juan Manuel de J. Escalante

an algorithmic exploration of the music we love. Each album’s sound wave proposes a new spatial and unique journey by transforming sound into matter/space: the hidden into something visible.
Third, Portishead [link]

'MICROSONIC LANDSCAPE' by Juan Manuel de J. Escalante

an algorithmic exploration of the music we love. Each album’s sound wave proposes a new spatial and unique journey by transforming sound into matter/space: the hidden into something visible.

Third, Portishead [link]

(via nightsinneon)

One Coffee Cup a Day. 30 Days 30 Cups by Cunicode

 One Cup a Day project is an experiment on creativity and rapid manufacturing, by ideating, designing, modeling and making available for production and purchase a coffee cup within 24 hours, everyday during one month. 

(Source: anndesignn, via anndesignn)

"If we are designing for people, why not call them that: people, a person, or perhaps humans. But no, we distance ourselves from the people for whom we design by giving them descriptive and somewhat degrading names, such as customer, consumer, or user. Customer - you know, someone who pays the bills. Consumer - one who consumes. User, or even worse, end user - the person who pushes the buttons, clicks the mouse, and keeps getting confused."

Jon Norman, Words Matter. Talk about people: Not Costumers, Not Consumers, Not Users, 2006